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13 thoughts on “Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes

  1. says:

    The regions where you can find the plants described in the book are very limited. If you live in the Midwest or east, don't bother with this book.


  2. says:

    I'll probably return the book. The main reason is that that nearly all of the dyes use alum as a mordant. Great for straight dying and bright colors. However, I want information on dyes that react with iron, since I am making prints on fabric and paper with rusted steel objects and leaves. So there was little information here for me.

    I would have appreciated something thorough, giving results with both iron and alum as mordants. Many books do this, since the colors are often very different. Iron is not toxic to the environment, it just gives neutral colors which some people really want.

    The other thing I found somewhat lacking is photographs of the plants, so one can go out into the natural environment and actually find them. She often photographed a handful of the flowers or stems, but not the plant itself.

    All in all, I suppose this would be a good start if you want brighter colors, live in the southwest, and are willing to only use alum as a mordant. It wasn't what I was looking for.


  3. says:

    What sets this book apart from other books on natural dyeing is the extensive information on where to find the plants (gardens, farmer's markets, fields, forests), and on when and how to harvest the plants. But the book also includes complete, illustrated instructions on how to dye wool fiber and yarn using inexpensive, easy to find equipment, and many, many recipes for making natural dyes from specific plants.

    The book is divided into two parts: Part One includes a brief historical discussion of gatherers and dyers, describes necessary materials and tools for natural dyeing, and sets out a "master dye bath" and other general recipes for dyeing. In this part, the author cautions that national and state parks have strict no harvest rules. However, she notes that national forests allow harvesting for personal use, that water and open space districts will often grant harvesting permits, and that other sources for harvesting plants exist. The author also explains that she has included no recipes for tin, chrome, or copper powder mordants (mordants bind the dye and fabric tightly), because widespread discarding of the metallic leftover dye water could quickly lead to unhealthy concentrations of these toxic metals in local soil. Clearly, the author is highly dedicated to the cause of environmental preservation, but her informative text is gentle in tone, and neither preaches nor communicates any "eco politically correct" sense of superiority.

    Part Two, which makes up the bulk of the book, describes the individual dye plants, and is organized by the four harvesting seasons. Each plant has its own mini section, which includes (1) a U.S. map colored in to show where the plant grows, (2) the Latin name, (3) a brief general description of the plant's history and characteristics, (4) specific instructions on finding the plant, (5) instructions on harvesting it, (6) a dye recipe tailored to the plant, (7) a clear photograph of the living plant, and (8) a photograph of a skein of yarn dyed with the plant. The beautiful full color photographs should enable most people to recognize the plants in the wild, and to be reasonably sure of what colors to expect in the dyed yarn.

    The complete list of plants is: Summer (hollyhock, ironweed, Mexican cliffrose, big basin sagebrush, zinnia, desert rhubarb, rabbitbrush, rosea, coyote brush, Japanese indigo, elderberry, goldenrod, tickseed sunflower); Fall (pokeweed, black walnut, trembling aspen, staghorn sumac, mountain mahogany, white sage, curly dock, sorrel); Winter (toyon, coffee berry, madder root, prickly pear cactus, cochineal insects, tansy); Spring (cota, sticky monkey flower, horsetail, fennel, California sagebrush, French broom).

    Although I have only a casual interest in actually dyeing my own yarn, this is a book that I'm delighted to own, and to have on my knitting reference shelf. I rate it at 5 stars.


  4. says:

    I learned so much from this book and, as a very beginner dyer, needed every bit of it. I live in California, so the plants used apply directly to my context (unlike most books on herbalism, ha), but I feel some of the other reviews missed a key point made in the book: to responsibly harvest, use, and explore what grows locally, seasonally, and is native to our own geography and context. Explore the plants that grow abundantly in your own region and/or garden. Make small amounts of dyes, practice, and see what happens. We don't need to ship products from all over the earth, at tremendous cost to the climate, when we can just use what grows in our own area.


  5. says:

    I am a plant dyer and have dyed my yarn for a few years now. This book gave me well explained and simple local plants by season to use to dye yarn. I tried Rabbit Brush and made another shade of yellow. It reinforced my knowledge I already have yet expanded it to other local trees and plants in my area that I will use to dye yarn. I like the author's experience, as well as her sustainable and ethical dye practices. Highly worth it. Unfortunately, I was enrolled to take the author's plant dye class up north but ended up not being able to make it. Hopefully, next year!


  6. says:

    Rebecca has written a very helpful book for those who want to use natural dyes in an ecologically sound way. Recipes for mordants, locations of plants throughout the US, beautiful color photos. Explanations of the reasons behind harvesting local plants to dye your natural fibers, especially animal fibers like wool. I've really enjoyed reading through this book and I'm excited to try some of the plants soon!


  7. says:

    I am a spinner in New England who is looking into dyeing my own yarn. This book looked like it contained some good info about mordanting and afterbaths, and it still does. However, I am disappointed that most of the dye recipes are based on plants found in the Southwest (sometimes almost exclusively in California).

    I can still use some of the recipes in this book with the plants in my area and it gives a pretty good explanation about various baths and whatnot. I will use this book as a jumping off point, but I wish that I could use of the recipes.


  8. says:

    This book is full of beautiful pictures and good instructions. I like how she shows where the plants can be found regionally on the map. I wish the recipes were written out like recipe with steps and lists instead of in paragraph form just for ease. I also wish there was instruction and pictures of sample for dying fabric too. Other than that it is a great book and I would recommend it to other dyers.


  9. says:

    The book is ok. But the flowers grow mostly in US


  10. says:

    I love the idea , but there are many books with information.This is a story of an experience in natural dying.
    Could be very exiting if you approach dyeing for the first time.


  11. says:

    Bought this for my wife. As it is American, some of the plants may not be available in the UK.


  12. says:

    I wanted some recipes for naturally dyeing yarn since I had taken a workshop on the subject. The book is great and quite helpful. I've already attempted several plant dyes that are native to our climate. Unfortunately most of the plants mentioned in the book grow west and south west of the US, the author beeing from California herself. I live in Eastern Canada, climate beeing different than California. Some of the plants are unfamiliar to us. Other than that the book is well written and easy to understand.


  13. says:

    I finished reading this in one night, but I will be returning to it day after day. This is an amazing book full of coloured photos, easy dye instructions and a wealth of wonderful, useful information about plants and dyes and our future with them. Rebecca divides this book into sections, one being the 4 seasons and which plants come out at that time and where in North America they are located. She even gives a few examples of crafts you can do with plants, such as lead prints and plant pounding. Just the two things I wanted to try :)
    Love it! I also recommend visiting her websites for info and inspiration
    []


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Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes

Free read Harvesting Color: How to Find Plants and Make Natural Dyes

Selection of the Crafters’ Choice Book ClubBeautiful natural dyes from plants found in the wild or grown in your own backyard As and crafters are discovering dyeing your own fabric can yield gorgeous colors Now master dyer Rebecca Burgess identifies 36 plants that will yield beautiful natural shades and shows how easy it is to make the dyes Pokeweed creates a vibrant magenta while a range of soft lavender shades is c. I'll probably return the book The main reason is that that nearly all of the dyes use alum as a mordant Great for straight dying and bright colors However I want information on dyes that react with iron since I am making prints on fabric and paper with rusted steel objects and leaves So there was little information here for meI would have appreciated something thorough giving results with both iron and alum as mordants Many books do this since the colors are often very different Iron is not toxic to the environment it just gives neutral colors which some people really wantThe other thing I found somewhat lacking is photographs of the plants so one can go out into the natural environment and actually find them She often photographed a handful of the flowers or stems but not the plant itselfAll in all I suppose this would be a good start if you want brighter colors live in the southwest and are willing to only use alum as a mordant It wasn't what I was looking for Chocolat crafters are discovering dyeing your own fabric Nestlé Desserts les 200 meilleures recettes can yield gorgeous Le chocolat qui me fait craquer colors Now master dyer Rebecca Burgess identifies 36 plants that will yield beautiful natural shades and shows how easy it is to make the dyes Pokeweed Chocolat creates a vibrant magenta while a range of soft lavender shades is Chocolat c. I'll probably return the book The main reason is that that nearly all of the dyes use alum as a mordant Great for straight dying and bright Les petits Marabout : Choco-Noisette colors However I want information on dyes that react with iron since I am making prints on fabric and paper with rusted steel objects and leaves So there was little information here for meI would have appreciated something thorough giving results with both iron and alum as mordants Many books do this since the Chocolat facile & gourmand - 100 recettes colors are often very different Iron is not toxic to the environment it just gives neutral Chocolat en 4 ingrédients colors which some people really wantThe other thing I found somewhat lacking is photographs of the plants so one Le chocolat qui me fait craquer can go out into the natural environment and actually find them She often photographed a handful of the flowers or stems but not the plant itselfAll in all I suppose this would be a good start if you want brighter Coffret 4 mini-livres Nestlé Dessert colors live in the southwest and are willing to only use alum as a mordant It wasn't what I was looking for

Download ð PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free  Rebecca Burgess

Reated from elderberries; indigo yields a bright blue and coyote brush creates stunning sunny yellowsGathering Color explains where to find these plants in the wild and for those that can be grown in your backyard how to nurture them and the best time and way to harvest them; maps show the range of each plant in the United States and Canada For the dyeing itself Burgess describes the simple euipment needed and provides. Rebecca has written a very helpful book for those who want to use natural dyes in an ecologically sound way Recipes for mordants locations of plants throughout the US beautiful color photos Explanations of the reasons behind harvesting local plants to dye your natural fibers especially animal fibers like wool I've really enjoyed reading through this book and I'm excited to try some of the plants soon Chic, du chocolat ! coyote brush Petits desserts au Nutella creates stunning sunny yellowsGathering Color explains where to find these plants in the wild and for those that Petit Larousse du chocolat can be grown in your backyard how to nurture them and the best time and way to harvest them; maps show the range of each plant in the United States and Canada For the dyeing itself Burgess describes the simple euipment needed and provides. Rebecca has written a very helpful book for those who want to use natural dyes in an ecologically sound way Recipes for mordants locations of plants throughout the US beautiful Dictionnaire exquis du chocolat: La référence pour tous les amoureux du chocolat color photos Explanations of the reasons behind harvesting local plants to dye your natural fibers especially animal fibers like wool I've really enjoyed reading through this book and I'm excited to try some of the plants soon

Rebecca Burgess  2 Read

A master dye recipe The book is organized seasonally; as an added bonus each section contains a knitting project using wools colored with dyes from plants harvested during that time of the year With breathtaking color photographs by Paige Green throughout Gathering Color is an essential guide to this growing field for crafters and DIYers; for ecologists and botanists; and for artists textile designers and art students. I am a spinner in New England who is looking into dyeing my own yarn This book looked like it contained some good info about mordanting and afterbaths and it still does However I am disappointed that most of the dye recipes are based on plants found in the Southwest sometimes almost exclusively in CaliforniaI can still use some of the recipes in this book with the plants in my area and it gives a pretty good explanation about various baths and whatnot I will use this book as a jumping off point but I wish that I could use of the recipes