review The Tempest Tales 109


The Tempest Tales

characters The Tempest Tales

Ries to win over Tempest’s soul Through the street smart Landry Mosley poses the provocative uestion Is sin for blacks the same as it is for whites And who gets to decid. Title The Tempest TalesAuthor Walter MosleyGenre Linked shorts Fantasy Morality fable Setting Predominantly New York CityReason for Reading 50 book PoC project AND THIS IS BOOK FIFTY I'd like to thank the Academy Relevance to the Project I don't really feel done so there may be a few wrap up posts coming along But for now I will say Mosley in the character of Landry Tempest argues that morality must be relative that what is wrong for a privileged white person may not be eually wrong for a poor black man Tempest continues to try to argue down the accounting angel who is sent to convince him he should go to hell for his sins Along the way things get complicatedFinished In Hours I took this to the laundromat yesterday morning because the other book I was reading is than 800 pages long helLOOOO Neal Stephenson and I thought it was too heavy to lug with all the laundry I wrapped up the book before I went to bed Pages 192Copyright Date 2008 Cover The silhouette of a man with a hint of wings behind himFirst line Tempest Landry didn't see himself as a bad manThemes and Triggers Angels devils crime situational ethics police violence ChristianityBest part I found Tempest a relatable characterWorst part In some ways it seemed that Joshua Angel was mainly there as a straight man He rarely had any answer other than but that's wrong you're a sinnerImaginary Theme Song No Rest for the WickedGrade C An interesting read but I didn't feel very strongly about itRecommended for If you enjoy debates about good and evil and Christian centric morality stuff then you will enjoy this book Related Reads The other Mosley book I've read is Devil in a Blue Dress This one is lighter than that As for other morality fables I highly recommend Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord

free read ¸ E-book, or Kindle E-pub ô Walter Mosley

Efuses to go to hell Stymied Saint Peter sends him back to Harlem where a guiding angel tries to convince him to accept Saint Peter's judgment and even the Devil himself t. In this entertaining short novel Walter Mosley reworks the ancient theme of an Angel disguised as a human on a mission This book is also a tribute to Langston Hughes and his Jesse B Semple stories When Tempest Landry arrives at the pearly gates he refuses to accept the judgement that he is a sinner Tempest is sent back to earth and Joshua Angel follows to convince him This leads to discussions about good vs bad free will fairness circumstance desire and One of my favorites is “Is a Mistake a Sin” Philosophical ideas and street smarts are debated in a light but thought provoking way There are several twists to the story as the Angel experiences many ‘unheavenly’ emotions such as passion and jealousy Although Joshua Angel is the narrator the story belongs to Tempest Landry I really enjoyed this book It was humorous but with very intriguing ideas I think Mr Hughes would approve

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Tempest Landry an everyman African American is “accidentally” killed by a cop Denied access to heaven because of what he considers a few minor transgressions Tempest r. This book has so many levels I don’t really know where to start reviewing it from First off the basic plot is about a man who is accidentally shot in Harlem and when he gets to the St Peter at the gates of heaven refuses his ruling The reason he refuses however is where the story becomes multi layered These different layers are narrated by the “accounting angel of heaven” who is sent to Earth with Tempest to convince him that he is a sinnerRacially The most obvious reason Tempest refuses to except that he is a sinner is because as a black man he lives in a different world than other people Sins and morals don’t have the same meanings in Harlem; you stab someone before they stab you you steal money from a church and give it to poor people instead of it going through middle men that take half the cash you cheat the insurance companies to save a girl’s life you lie to a jury so a man you know is a killer goes to jail even if he’s not guilty of the specific crime he’s on trial forEvery time the Angel tries to argue with Tempest Tempest points out how regardless of if there is no race in heaven there is on Earth Life will always be different for an entire race of people in America and with a life so different it is impossible to judge them by the same standards I find this to be such a beautifully well thought out way to put this idea No matter what anyone says about wanting racial euality life will always be different in inner city areas like Harlem or the South Side of Chicago Less money for schools police officers who are inherently racist and a culture with deep roots in gang violence makes it impossible to judge the morals of these people by the morals of someone living in a suburban neighborhood Everything is about context and Mosley points this out flawlessly on every pageCelestially Maybe the thing that grabbed me the most about this book though is the way it uestions the motives of heaven At one point Tempest asks the Angel how he could possibly judge his sins if he’s never felt hunger or pain or loss or racism How can some almighty power judge the actions of humanity when it has never experienced humanity for itself Even if I did believe in a heaven I would be pissed to be put on trial by a bunch of saintly figures who hadn’t actually experienced life in over 2000 yearsSo throughout the book the Angel begins to see the truth in this He begins to experience humanity first hand; he falls in love he gets tired he falls ill he faces hard times the likes of which can’t possibly be known in paradise Slowly over a period of months does he start to realize the truth in Tempest’s arguments How can he condemn he for surviving How can he send a man to hell for saving a girl’s life even if he had to lie and steal to do itThis book provides a startling amount of humanity wrapped up in powerful prose It makes you think and makes you believe and yet uestion everything all at the same time It sweeps you up and sends you soaring and then crashes you back down into the worst parts of life while still allowing you to see the heavenly lining I think I found one of my new favorite authors

  • Hardcover
  • 157
  • The Tempest Tales
  • Walter Mosley
  • English
  • 05 July 2019
  • 9781574780437

About the Author: Walter Mosley

Walter Mosley b 1952 is the author of the bestselling mystery series featuring Easy Rawlins as well as numerous other works from literary fiction and science fiction to a young adult novel and political monographs His short fiction has been widely published and his nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times Magazine and the Nation among other publications Mosley is the winner of numero



10 thoughts on “The Tempest Tales

  1. says:

    Mistaken for another man Wily Tempest is “accidentally” shot by police Sent to receive the judgment of heaven he discovers his sins according to St Peter condemns him to hell Tempest takes exception to the saint’s definition of sin; he refuses to go to hell and explains that he a poor Black man living in Harlem did what he did for family friends and loveIn the episodic battle with heaven and hell for his ultimate destiny Tempest also takes the reader on a philosophic and humorous journey where free will is pitted against class and race – and the music of heaven is pitted against the blues A Must Read

  2. says:

    Wow This book was very thought provoking It deals with the gray areas of sin and why we may not be what we think we are A MUST read

  3. says:

    This book has so many levels I don’t really know where to start reviewing it from First off the basic plot is about a man who is accidentally shot in Harlem and when he gets to the St Peter at the gates of heaven refuses his ruling The reason he refuses however is where the story becomes multi layered These different layers are narrated by the “accounting angel of heaven” who is sent to Earth with Tempest to convince him that he is a sinnerRacially The most obvious reason Tempest refuses to except that he is a sinner is because as a black man he lives in a different world than other people Sins and morals don’t have the same meanings in Harlem; you stab someone before they stab you you steal money from a church and give it to poor people instead of it going through middle men that take half the cash you cheat the insurance companies to save a girl’s life you lie to a jury so a man you know is a killer goes to jail even if he’s not guilty of the specific crime he’s on trial forEvery time the Angel tries to argue with Tempest Tempest points out how regardless of if there is no race in heaven there is on Earth Life will always be different for an entire race of people in America and with a life so different it is impossible to judge them by the same standards I find this to be such a beautifully well thought out way to put this idea No matter what anyone says about wanting racial euality life will always be different in inner city areas like Harlem or the South Side of Chicago Less money for schools police officers who are inherently racist and a culture with deep roots in gang violence makes it impossible to judge the morals of these people by the morals of someone living in a suburban neighborhood Everything is about context and Mosley points this out flawlessly on every pageCelestially Maybe the thing that grabbed me the most about this book though is the way it uestions the motives of heaven At one point Tempest asks the Angel how he could possibly judge his sins if he’s never felt hunger or pain or loss or racism How can some almighty power judge the actions of humanity when it has never experienced humanity for itself? Even if I did believe in a heaven I would be pissed to be put on trial by a bunch of saintly figures who hadn’t actually experienced life in over 2000 yearsSo throughout the book the Angel begins to see the truth in this He begins to experience humanity first hand; he falls in love he gets tired he falls ill he faces hard times the likes of which can’t possibly be known in paradise Slowly over a period of months does he start to realize the truth in Tempest’s arguments How can he condemn he for surviving? How can he send a man to hell for saving a girl’s life even if he had to lie and steal to do it?This book provides a startling amount of humanity wrapped up in powerful prose It makes you think and makes you believe and yet uestion everything all at the same time It sweeps you up and sends you soaring and then crashes you back down into the worst parts of life while still allowing you to see the heavenly lining I think I found one of my new favorite authors

  4. says:

    Well this was a very entertaining take on an old idea good vs evil in the battle for men's souls and destinies It had a lot of the street smart flavor and memorable characters of Mosley's best works and was very reminiscent intentionally so of Langston Hughes to whom it was dedicated Joshua the Accounting Angel was a particularly well drawn character and I really felt for him as he struggled with his burgeoning humanity while trying to do his job of convincing Tempest to accept his eternal damnation The one I had trouble with was Tempest I loved him I hated him I sympathized with him but I never really believed in him It felt like Mosley was having trouble holding onto the character Tempest would go from being a poor uneducated man who said things like Im'a axe you a uestion to talking about an incident in science class involving exploding Bunsen burners and secondary explosions due to pent up gases in the pipes There were jarring bits like that throughout the book which tended to break the flow of the story for me A worthwhile read even so and probably a good choice for book clubs

  5. says:

    The Tempest Tales intrigued me because it is the story of a man who finds himself face to face with StPeter at the pearly gates and refuses to accept StPeter's divine judgment regarding the life he lived on earth and conseuently also refuses to be consigned to eternal damnation aka hell He returns to earth accompanied by an accounting angel who is sent to convince Tempest Landry to accept his sins and receive his just reward By the time this short tale is done Tempest Landry emerges as a much righteous individual than he appears at the outset The angel finds himself having some very distinctly mortal experiences that help to alter his view ofthe judgment set forth by StPeter and before the angel's mortal experience is concluded both he and Tempest come face to face with Satan himself In this sometimes philosophic and humorous journey free will is pitted against class and race One of the reasons I decided to read it is because it is a recommended book club read I can see this book could make for some interesting discussions

  6. says:

    In this entertaining short novel Walter Mosley reworks the ancient theme of an Angel disguised as a human on a mission This book is also a tribute to Langston Hughes and his Jesse B Semple stories When Tempest Landry arrives at the pearly gates he refuses to accept the judgement that he is a sinner Tempest is sent back to earth and Joshua Angel follows to convince him This leads to discussions about good vs bad free will fairness circumstance desire and One of my favorites is “Is a Mistake a Sin?” Philosophical ideas and street smarts are debated in a light but thought provoking way There are several twists to the story as the Angel experiences many ‘unheavenly’ emotions such as passion and jealousy Although Joshua Angel is the narrator the story belongs to Tempest Landry I really enjoyed this book It was humorous but with very intriguing ideas I think Mr Hughes would approve

  7. says:

    This is NOT a religious book I say that so I can ask you do you know what sin is? Read this book and you may change your mind Written as only Walter Mosley could it's funny and makes you think Imagine uestioning St Peter at the pearly gates

  8. says:

    Classic Mosley In no particular order good v evil v good god v devil v god and white v black v white As always Mosley brings a teachable moment and this teaches with the best of them

  9. says:

    Title The Tempest TalesAuthor Walter MosleyGenre Linked shorts Fantasy Morality fable Setting Predominantly New York CityReason for Reading 50 book PoC project AND THIS IS BOOK FIFTY I'd like to thank the Academy Relevance to the Project I don't really feel done so there may be a few wrap up posts coming along But for now I will say Mosley in the character of Landry Tempest argues that morality must be relative that what is wrong for a privileged white person may not be eually wrong for a poor black man Tempest continues to try to argue down the accounting angel who is sent to convince him he should go to hell for his sins Along the way things get complicatedFinished In Hours I took this to the laundromat yesterday morning because the other book I was reading is than 800 pages long helLOOOO Neal Stephenson and I thought it was too heavy to lug with all the laundry I wrapped up the book before I went to bed Pages 192Copyright Date 2008 Cover The silhouette of a man with a hint of wings behind himFirst line Tempest Landry didn't see himself as a bad manThemes and Triggers Angels devils crime situational ethics police violence ChristianityBest part I found Tempest a relatable characterWorst part In some ways it seemed that Joshua Angel was mainly there as a straight man He rarely had any answer other than but that's wrong you're a sinnerImaginary Theme Song No Rest for the WickedGrade C An interesting read but I didn't feel very strongly about itRecommended for If you enjoy debates about good and evil and Christian centric morality stuff then you will enjoy this book Related Reads The other Mosley book I've read is Devil in a Blue Dress This one is lighter than that As for other morality fables I highly recommend Redemption in Indigo by Karen Lord

  10. says:

    Walter Mosley made his way onto my Spring and Summer book list because of the availablity of his works at the Columbus Metropolitan Library The Tempest Tales is pretty thought provoking A death opens up the door on a story about life that had me uestioning what would I do irImagine that you are standing before St Peter and you've just heard that instead of entering heaven you're going to hell Only you refuse to accept that decision This is how The Tempest Tales beginI really liked this particular book It has a lot of elements working in the story line that keeps you thoughts moving in a lot of different directions

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